2016

Zion Nat'l Park, Columbine

Eat Well, Plan Ahead, Nourish Your Body and Mind

The demanding schedule of the busy professional may not include foods that support optimal health. Eating well does not take an excessive amount of time and can be realistically incorporated into even the busiest calendar.

Real food nourishes the body and the mind, benefiting physical and emotional health and well-being. Processed and fast foods do not support optimal health and are associated with an increased risk for diabetes, coronary disease, and cancer—just the opposite of real foods. Planning ahead to increase your access to real food takes about an hour per week and is a totally worthwhile endeavor!

Begin in the grocery store. If you are not already doing so, stock up on whole foods, which are real foods that have not been processed in a laboratory.  Real food does not have high fructose corn syrup, partially hydrogenated oils or food coloring added. If the food contains grains, they are whole grains as opposed to refined grains. Knock yourself out on fresh fruit and veggies, bring home new grains such as quinoa or barley and unusual beans like cannelloni or garbanzo, and consider feta cheese, pine nuts, red peppers and eggplant… Give yourself at least 4 weeks of subtle change in your grocery store purchases to become familiar and comfortable with the unlimited possibilities!

Next, identify a time during the week that you can set aside one hour. Dial in your favorite classical music station. Now the preparation begins.  Put up a pot of boiling water for the grain of the week, and another for the beans or legumes.  A disclaimer here: I am a big fan of canned beans—they are easy to use, there is a huge variety to choose from, and they can be purchased with low salt or no salt content. Slice the peppers and eggplant, brush with garlic infused olive oil, and broil for a few minutes on each side. You can broil all sorts of veggies using this method, by the way; zucchini, asparagus, cauliflower, potatoes, carrots, beets, and many more! After the veggies have cooled, place them into a storage container where they will last several days in the fridge. Store the cooked grains and/or beans the same way.

You are ready to move on to raw vegetables.  Chop up broccoli, cauliflower, purple and green cabbage, carrots, and celery; wash, dry, and tear up good quality lettuce, arugula and spinach (or buy it bagged and pre-washed). All of this can be stored in the fridge and at a moment’s notice can be thrown together for a salad or a stir fry.  Add a chicken breast, sliced tempeh, or piece of grilled ahi, and you’ve got a yummy and healthy lunch or dinner!

Robin Mallery

Robin Mallery

Robin Mallery is passionate about food! Starting from where and how it's grown, to how far that food travels to the dinner table, to how it is prepared and savored...Robin blends shopping, cooking, and eating tips with her unique Kitchen Zen and mindful meals approach to enjoying real food.

While you are waiting for her to finish the upcoming book, "Kitchen Zen: The Journey to Nourish Body and Soul in Our Changing World", you can find Robin's sporadic blog posts here or on FaceBook.
Robin Mallery

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“Robin brings dedication, focus, passion, and intellect to whatever endeavor she is pursuing. She does not just talk about good health, she practices it thoroughly every day of her life. When she talks to clients about healthy lifestyle choices, they are able to see the effects of healthy choices by observing the woman in front of them!”
Arthur S., Client

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